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Create / Events & Workshops / Jewellery Workshop with Jacqueline Bell

Jewellery Workshop with Jacqueline Bell
Craft Design House, Reflecting Mackintosh Workshop Programme
The Lighthouse
22 June
12pm - 5pm

The Workshop will consist of using the Technique of Metal Embossing to allow participants to transfer designs or elements of designs made by Charles Rennie Mackintosh on to fine sheets of metal, by drawing and pushing the metal to produce their own interpretation.

Metal Embossing is an ancient technique used to embellish thin sheets of metal by using drawing principles to create lines, shape, shading, and texture on the surface of the metal.

The metal sheet can be pushed from the back or front to create 3-dimensional form.

The technique is very simple and is suitable for use by all age groups and abilities. Children 8 years and over can take part.

The Workshop will be delivered in a 5-hour session.

Metal available will be Copper and will capture the essence of Charles Rennie Mackintosh's work.

The finished piece will be used to make a brooch or little plaque to attach to the lid of a box, small sketchbook cover or can be used as an ornament.

Minimum of 6 and maximum of 12 per workshop - £85.00 per person

*please note we need a minimum of 6 participating

Click here to book a place

Programme

Jacqueline will give a 20-minute demonstration, using sample pieces to explain the process. Participants will be shown how to transfer a design from the sample drawings onto the Metal and explained how to use the tools.

  • 1- Choose a design which will be provided from a selection inspired or taken from the work of MacIntosh. Sheets of metal (copper) will be provided to transfer the design to. Decide if you would like to make a brooch, box or sketchbook cover.
  • 2- Using the technique demonstrated by the Tutor, transfer the outline of the design onto the metal. Leave a border around the edges which will be folded over once the design is complete. This is to prevent a sharp edge and allow us to fix it onto the brooch, box or book.
  • 3- Working on a soft surface (back of a mouse mat, paper, foam craft sheets) and using a stylus, which is a tool similar to a pencil, push firmly but gently to indent the outline into the metal.
  • 4- Using other tools of a variety of different shapes, the metal can be drawn on and pushed upwards and downwards from both sides to give three-dimensional shape and decorative detail. To indent and create volume, work the metal from the back on a soft surface. To flatten the surface, place the piece face up on a hard surface and rub back with the paper-pencil provided.
  • 5- Once the design is complete, the corners will be folded and the participants can choose to use a brooch fitting or attach the embossed piece to the lid or cover of a wooden box or little sketchbook. For the box, it will be necessary to drill small holes in the corners using a hand drill and attach the piece using small screws. The brooch back and sketchbook can be mounted using glue.

Materials provided

  • Drawings for Designs
  • Metal sheet, Copper
  • Tools and mats to work
  • Brooch backs, glue, finishing tape.
  • Wooden boxes and sketchbooks.

This workshop is part of Craft Design House's Reflecting Mackintosh Workshop Programme. Click here to find out more about the Reflecting Mackintosh Exhibition.

About Jacqueline Bell

Edinburgh-based Jacqueline trained as a goldsmith in Italy, studying industrial jewellery design at I'Istituto di Formazione Professionale in Florence and technique at Le Arti Orage jewellery academy. She designed and made bespoke pieces for clients of Florentine goldsmiths Giancarlo Panti and Giudo Pucci and has been working independently for over 20 years.

As well as creating bespoke pieces, she produces one new limited collection each year, entirely handcrafted from recycled precious metals to reduce the environmental impact of her work.

Jacqueline likes to take those traditional design techniques she learned in her formative years and add a contemporary twist. The end result is classic, elegant jewellery people love to wear.

A believer in letting the metal take the lead, she often starts making without knowing how a piece will develop so her work is constantly evolving through research and experimentation.

'In my work, I use skills and techniques that have been passed down from maker to maker over centuries. I really love playing my part in continuing to share this knowledge by tutoring in jewellery making.'

 
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